Making your photos look like paintings and other such art, pt.2

Continuing from last week, we have the more colorful art forms being represented here. A mix and match of different effects to create images that I like.

Bethesda Fountain as if it were a pastel.

Bethesda Fountain as if it were a pastel.

Incoming storm painting.

Incoming storm painting.

The Gapstow as a highly saturated impressionistic painting.

The Gapstow as a highly saturated impressionistic painting.

A highly saturated shot of the pond and the Gapstow.

A highly saturated shot of the pond and the Gapstow.

Another Gapstow impressionistic pastel piece, but with less texture overlay.

Another Gapstow impressionistic pastel piece, but with less texture overlay.

Another angle of the impressionistic Gapstow,

Another angle of the impressionistic Gapstow,

The Japanese Garden grotto with high saturation and contrast with a vignette that almost makes it feel metallic.

The Japanese Garden grotto with high saturation and contrast with a vignette that almost makes it feel metallic.

Another image of the grotto with a pastel feel.

Another image of the grotto with a pastel feel.

This image of the waterfall in the grotto looks just like a painting. Leaving the lens open to get the moving water effect helps with it.

This image of the waterfall in the grotto looks just like a painting. Leaving the lens open to get the moving water effect helps with it.

Highly saturated with a lens flare.

Highly saturated with a lens flare.

Turning an every day shot of a garden into a painting sometimes aids the appeal of the shot.

Turning an every day shot of a garden into a painting sometimes aids the appeal of the shot.

The bench as a pastel image.

The bench as a pastel image.

A painting version of the arbor that makes for a nice garden feel.

A painting version of the arbor that makes for a nice garden feel.

I'm actually surprised I never see artwork of this sundial. Here it looks like a stylized painting due to the high level of saturation and vibrance.

I’m actually surprised I never see artwork of this sundial. Here it looks like a stylized painting due to the high level of saturation and vibrance.

A faded watercolor of the Japanese pond, with the highlights changed to yellow to change the atmosphere.

A faded watercolor of the Japanese pond, with the highlights changed to yellow to change the atmosphere.

Super saturated color of a monster plant with a vignette.

Super saturated color of a monster plant with a vignette.

Taking out the texture makes it look like a watercolor.

Taking out the texture makes it look like a watercolor.

Ducks in technicolor.

Ducks in technicolor.

This almost looks like an 80's music video.

This almost looks like an 80’s music video.

A painting with a touch of the romantic.

A painting with a touch of the romantic.

This effect makes the shot look like an illustration in a book.

This effect makes the shot look like an illustration in a book.

Another illustration effect on the side of the reservoir.

Another illustration effect on the side of the reservoir.

Going forward, we will include these variations on some of my trips, rather than bash us all over the head with these massive entries.

Next week: Back to the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens for some non-cherry blossom plantings and such.

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About nsantasier

I am an actor, fight choreographer, playwright, and photographer based in and around NYC. I shoot on a Canon Rebel XS with either a Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens or a Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4.0-5.6 IS Telephoto Zoom lens as they are the only lenses I currently own.
This entry was posted in Architecture, Art, Artsy, Bethesda Fountain, Brooklyn, Brooklyn Botanical, Central Park, Flower, garden, Hiking, lake, Landscape, Metropolitan Museum of Art, nature, NYC, Park, People, Sculpture, Spring. Bookmark the permalink.

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