A Summer Sunset Over the Shakespeare Garden

I went to the first Shakespeare in the Park show this year but got there early, so I wandered around the Shakespeare Garden as the sun started setting. I’ve covered it in the past and I wasn’t planning on taking pictures, but the effects of the setting sun were just too good to pass up.

Light shines through the trees onto the path.

Light shines through the trees onto the path.

The sundial awaits.

The sundial awaits.

The sun lights only a section.

The sun lights only a section.

Usage of sun rays.

Usage of sun rays.

Spooky angles.

Spooky angles.

Looking up to the dial.

Looking up to the dial.

Wide open and drinking in the sun.

Wide open and drinking in the sun.

Sun setting behind the Swedish Cottage Marionette Theatre.

Sun setting behind the Swedish Cottage Marionette Theatre.

The staircase is hit with light.

The staircase is hit with light.

The stone staircase.

The stone staircase.

Light sprays across the walkways.

Light sprays across the walkways.

Next week: The southern side of Morningside Heights Park.

Posted in Art, Artsy, Central Park, Flower, garden, Landscape, nature, NYC, Park, Summer | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Luxury Hike of the Adirondack Interpretive Center

Took a trip up to Newcomb, NY for some hiking. We ended up at the Adirondack Interpretive Center, which has several trails (they are short so we did all of them, which ends up being approx 3.5 miles) with names like Rich Lake Trail, Peninsula Trail, Sucker Brook Trail, and RW Sage Memorial Trail. These are divided into two segments so the best way to do it is to do one side, then eat a nice lunch, and the do the other half. The trail is connected with SUNY ESF¬†and there are classes for schools there. It’s handicap accessible, something I’m not used to with hiking trails, but after a long ride out to it, I was thankful for how easy the trails were. They are well maintained and there are several bridges. I called it a luxury hike as there are benches for sitting along the trails. Since they go around two lakes and several brooks, the ground is very soft and you have to be careful after a night of rain that you don’t get stuck in the mud. Also, in early summer, lots of bugs. We survived. The most difficult hurdle we had was the steep staircase found on the Peninsula Trail which we did last. So yeah, that kicked everyone’s butt.

Where we started.

Where we started.

Viewing through the trees.

Viewing through the trees.

Proof of the luxury hike.

Proof of the luxury hike.

Wooden bridges over marshes and wetlands.

Wooden bridges over marshes and wetlands.

Railing on bridges over the creeks and rivers.

Railing on bridges over the creeks and rivers.

Bridges help get nice views of the lakes without trees in the way.

Bridges help get nice views of the lakes without trees in the way.

Some of the water flowed very quickly.

Some of the water flowed very quickly.

Now, will you go left or right?

Now, will you go left or right?

The trees made for great shelter from the hot sun.

The trees made for great shelter from the hot sun.

A brown river.

A brown brook.

Coming up on another long bridge.

Coming up on another long bridge.

Really nice views of the lakes.

Really nice views of the lakes.

Sunshine for all on the lake.

Sunshine for all on the lake.

This gazebo marks the other side of the trails.

This gazebo marks the other side of the trails.

Somebody left their boat out.

Somebody left their boat out.

Go ahead, pull the chain, see what happens.

Go ahead, pull the chain, see what happens.

A spooky choice to make.

A spooky choice to make.

Out on the middle of a long bridge with no railing.

Out on the middle of a long bridge with no railing.

Very peaceful out in the woods.

Very peaceful out in the woods.

Stairs. Why are there so many stairs!?

Stairs. Why are there so many stairs!?

This rock is at least 20 feet tall ... I think.

This rock is at least 20 feet tall … I think.

Next week: We return to the Shakespeare Garden as the sun sets on a summer night before some Shakespeare at the Delacorte.

Posted in Adirondacks, Hiking, lake, Landscape, mountain, nature, Park, Summer | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shelving Rock Falls – A Short Hike with Lots of Water

As Summer arrived, I took a trip up to the Adirondacks to relax, get some hiking in, and see family. One of our shorter hikes was to Shelving Rock Falls. The trail is on the eastern side of Lake George and is a very long drive that takes you into the middle of nowhere. We found the parking lot and started from there. The beginning of the trail – an old carriage road – had what looked like run off damage from the rains and a lot of rocks covered the path. It didn’t last for too long (probably 100 feet) until the path smoothed out. There was other rain damage later, but nothing to this degree.

There is a way down to see the falls that is steeper. I opted to go down for a good look, then followed a smaller path along and above the river. There were some downed trees which made it a bit difficult, but not too much so. The falls themselves are about 75 feet tall and are quite sheltered by the trees. However, if you hit it at midday, the sun floods the area with light. Following the falls and river will quickly get you to the Log Bay area of Lake George. There were more trails to check out but, due to the rains, they were flooded. So we went to the lake and turned back around.

The land was once owned by a man named George Knapp who built his estate up by the falls. It was destroyed in a fire in 1917. There is a ruin of the gardens along the path by the falls.

The path starts here.

The path starts here.

The calm before the falls.

The calm before the falls.

Reflection in the still water.

Reflection in the still water.

The top of the falls have a large pipe in them.

The top of the falls have a large pipe in them.

Half of the falls.

Half of the falls.

The other half.

The other half.

The whole falls.

The whole falls.

This rock looks like a turtle head.

This rock looks like a turtle head.

The pool at the basin.

The pool at the basin.

I'm standing on some rocks out in the middle of the river before another drop off.

I’m standing on some rocks out in the middle of the river before another drop off.

The drop off behind me.

The drop off behind me.

Lots of felled trees (the path I just walked is on the right side of the water).

Lots of felled trees (the path I just walked is on the right side of the water).

This tree pulled up some rocks.

This tree pulled up some rocks.

Run off from the rain across the path.

Run off from the rain across the path.

Hello Lake George.

Hello Lake George.

An island out in the lake.

An island out in the lake.

The carriage path is wide and nicely shaded.

The carriage path is wide and nicely shaded.

The ruins up by the falls (you only see these along the carriage path, not the falls path - we caught them on the way out).

The ruins up by the falls (you only see these along the carriage path, not the falls path – we caught them on the way out).

More of the ruins.

More of the ruins.

The moss has invaded.

The moss has invaded.

Back to this bridge and the parking lot.

Back to this bridge and the parking lot.

Next week: A luxury hike at the Adirondack Interpretive Center.

Posted in Adirondacks, Hiking, lake, Lake George, Landscape, nature, Park, People, Summer, waterfall | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Central Park Zoo

It’s always been surprising to people that I’ve lived in this area for so many years and never visited the Central Park Zoo. The truth behind it is that I’ve never had much of an urge to go in since it is so small. I had walked through the cross over several times and seen that there was always a crowd inside both sections of the zoo: the main section and the Tisch Children’s Zoo. On this trip, I opted to just go to the main section as I had no urge to go to a petting zoo with my camera as I have no children with me.

Originally, the main attraction of the zoo was the polar bear. This has, sadly, changed last year. Now the main attraction is the snow leopard, who is the craftiest hider I have seen in a zoo ever. I had to go to his pen several times before he came out of hiding in the tall grass and bushes.

Some of the light allowing architecture on the walkways.

Some of the light allowing architecture on the walkways.

Giant fish in the Tropic Zone.

Giant fish in the Tropic Zone.

This one tried to take my head off when I walked in.

This one tried to take my head off when I walked in.

Sleeping bats on the ceiling.

Sleeping bats on the ceiling.

Overlooking all the birds in the area.

Overlooking all the birds in the area.

Bright red eye.

Bright red eye.

The ivy makes these very scenic.

The ivy makes these very scenic.

Snow monkeys occupy the center of the zoo.

Snow monkeys occupy the center of the zoo.

Duck cleaning.

Duck cleaning.

This is my turtle.

This is my turtle.

Snow monkey getting a snack.

Snow monkey getting a snack.

A red panda peering through the leaves at the strange humans.

A red panda peering through the leaves at the strange humans.

Interesting looking crane.

Interesting looking crane.

Penguin love in the polar circle.

Penguin love in the polar circle.

Wise owl.

Wise owl.

Seats in the central garden.

Seats in the central garden.

The sea lion pool.

The sea lion pool.

Basking in the sun.

Basking in the sun.

Readying to dive.

Readying to dive.

These statues are all over the zoo.

These statues are all over the zoo.

Top of the rock.

Top of the rock.

Snarling.

Snarling.

Scratch my neck.

Scratch my neck.

A section for galas and events.

A section for galas and events.

The Arsenal/Administration building.

The Arsenal/Administration building.

The Delacorte Clock.

The Delacorte Clock and north entrance.

A fountain outside the zoo.

A fountain outside the zoo.

The entrance to the children's zoo.

The entrance to the children’s zoo.

Next week: Shelving Rock Falls up in Lake George.

Posted in Animals, Architecture, Central Park, garden, NYC, Park, Spring | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Shakespeare in the Park … but not at the Delacorte

Besides doing photography, I work in the arts in various positions. I was brought in by a friend to take a look at the fights in an outdoor production of Romeo and Juliet being put on by Manhattan Shakespeare Project this summer. I have been to several of their productions in the past, and I stopped by the park while they were performing this piece as well. I took a bunch of shots, so here are some images. If you have time this week they still have performances in Morningside Park (I saw them in Central Park).

The company is made up of all women and the show uses six actors doubling/tripling/howevermany-ing parts. All cast info and show dates and times can be found on their webpage linked above.

And in this space, we shall perform Shakespeare!

And in this space, we shall perform Shakespeare!

Why is everyone running away from culture?

Why is everyone running away from culture?

Palm to palm.

Palm to palm.

A more straight forward holy palmers kiss.

A more straight forward holy palmers kiss.

Engage mopey teenager mode.

Engage mopey teenager mode.

Mercutio hits the scene.

Mercutio hits the scene.

Pining teens in Shakespeare world.

Pining teens in Shakespeare world.

So. Hungover. Stupid party!

So. Hungover. Stupid party!

Slings and arrows for all!

Slings and arrows for all!

Invisible sword fighting.

Invisible sword fighting.

Fight time.

Fight time.

There is some lifting of people.

There is some lifting of people.

They get a bit vicious.

They get a bit vicious.

Pining away for their lover.

Pining away for their lover.

Laughter before the storm.

Laughter before the storm.

Oh wait, this is a tragedy.

Oh wait, this is a tragedy.

Thoughts of pining and death.

Thoughts of pining and death.

There's a body on the stage.

There’s a body on the stage.

Next week: The Central Park Zoo – tiny but picturesque.

Posted in Art, Central Park, costume, Movement, NYC, Park, People, Spring | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

South of the Cloisters: Flower and Stone

We continue on our walk through Ft Tryon Park by walking back into Heather Garden. Then we take a look at Linden Terrace which concludes the trip. It was a short one, which was due to the purpose of the visit – seeing the arches. Everything else was just a bonus. Linden Terrace is a popular spot for weddings due to it’s views and shelter from the harsh sunlight.

Lots of sunlight to bring out the colors. There is very little cover in this garden.

Lots of sunlight to bring out the colors. There is very little cover in this garden.

Blowing on this one does not work.

Blowing on this one does not work.

Purple ball.

Purple ball.

Interesting looking.

Interesting looking.

The sun makes interesting shadows with this bloom.

The sun makes interesting shadows with this bloom.

Trying the macro.

Trying the macro.

One of the few all white flowers.

One of the few all white flowers.

Entering Linden Terrace.

Entering Linden Terrace.

The terrace is deep in shade.

The terrace is deep in shade.

The view from the terrace.

The view from the terrace.

An outcropping leads to an observation deck.

An outcropping leads to an observation deck.

The path to the deck.

The path to the deck.

A view from the deck to the Cloisters.

A view from the deck to the Cloisters.

Detail of the flagpole base.

Detail of the flagpole base.

Steps down from the terrace.

Steps down from the terrace.

The bridge to the observation deck.

The bridge to the observation deck.

Ivy is growing everywhere.

Ivy is growing everywhere.

The shadow play is made interesting by the trees.

The shadow play is made interesting by the trees.

Benches on the east side of the garden - Stan Michels Promenade.

Benches on the east side of the garden – Stan Michels Promenade.

Heather Garden with the GW Bridge in the background.

Heather Garden with the GW Bridge in the background.

Next week: Some Shakespeare in Central Park at Summit Rock.

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Fort Tryon Park: The Remains of a Mansion

I had worked on a tv show north of the city. During the drive to set, we passed by Fort Tryon Park. I noticed some arches by the side of the road and had no idea what they were. So I decided to go up there and take a look. After doing some internet research, I learned that these arches are the remains of the driveway up to the old Billings Mansion, or Tryon Hall. Sadly, the estate burned down in the 1920s and the arches, along with a cottage that was the gatehouse, are all that are left.

The 190th St subway station.

The 190th St subway station.

The corner of the park entrance.

The corner of the park entrance.

The arches seen from above.

The arches seen from above.

The cottage/gatehouse.

The cottage/gatehouse.

Entrance to the park.

Entrance to the park.

The Heather Garden, which we will look at more next week.

The Heather Garden, which we will look at more next week.

The entrance to the driveway. It is blocked off from the West Side Highway.

The entrance to the driveway. It is blocked off from the West Side Highway.

Walking up from the entrance to the arches.

Walking up from the entrance to the arches.

The arches form a nice arcade.

The arches form a nice arcade.

The sun shining into the driveway.

The sun shining into the driveway.

Streetlamps and graffiti are prevalent.

Streetlamps and graffiti are prevalent.

It's a popular path for joggers, despite the brick.

It’s a popular path for joggers, despite the brick.

Another reason for the trip was to recon a setting for a book I am working on.

Another reason for the trip was to recon a setting for a book I am working on.

A view of the arches from the north side.

A view of the arches from the north side.

The trees make for nice camouflage.

The trees make for nice camouflage.

A bench at the base of a cliff looking very story-esque.

A bench at the base of a cliff looking very story-esque.

Stairs that will take us back up to the garden.

Stairs that will take us back up to the garden.

Next week: More of Fort Tryon Park. Everything else south of the Cloisters (since we already covered them).

Posted in Architecture, garden, Hiking, Landscape, nature, NYC, Park, Spring | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments